Impact on India

Imprint on freedom struggles

Print edition : December 22, 2017

September 8, 1961: Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev (centre), Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev (right) at the Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow. Photo: THE HINDU ARCHIVES

The Indian revolutionary M.N. Roy (black tie and jacket) with Vladimir Lenin (left), Maxim Gorky (behind Lenin), and others. A 1920 picture.

Bhagat Singh. On January 21, 1930, he and his fellow revolutionaries sent the following telegram from the courtroom where they were being tried in the second Lahore Conspiracy Case: “On Lenin Day we send hearty greetings to all those who are doing something for carrying forward the ideas of the great Lenin. We wish success to the great experiment Russia is carrying out. We join our voice to that of the international working class movement. The proletariat will win, capitalism will be defeated. Death to imperialism.”

February 4, 1959: President Rajendra Prasad inaugurating the first blast furnace of the Bhilai Steel Plant in Madhya Pradesh. When the countries of the imperialist West refused to provide aid and assistance for India’s independent industrial development, arguing that India should import the needs for its industrial growth from Western countries, the Soviet Union stepped in to provide both capital and technology for establishing India’s steel plants and other factories, laying the foundations for a self-reliant economy based on infrastructural development. Photo: The Hindu Archives

October 11, 1964: President Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia (clockwise from top left), President Gamal Abdel Nasser of the United Arab Republic, Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri of India and President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana signing the final joint communique at the closing session of the Conference of 47 Non-Aligned Nations in Cairo. Photo: THE HINDU ARCHIVES

Patrice Lumumba of Congo. So powerful was the rise of the national liberation struggles that during the Cold War period when U.S. imperialism’s global cry was “war against communism”, it came to the conclusion after the experiences in China, Vietnam and Korea that Communists leading national liberation struggles would inevitably lead those countries towards socialism. Hence, it embarked on a diabolic plan in Africa to eliminate such leaders physically. Photo: The Hindu Archives

Samora Machel of Mozambique. So powerful was the rise of the national liberation struggles that during the Cold War period when U.S. imperialism’s global cry was “war against communism”, it came to the conclusion after the experiences in China, Vietnam and Korea that Communists leading national liberation struggles would inevitably lead those countries towards socialism. Hence, it embarked on a diabolic plan in Africa to eliminate such leaders physically. Photo: AFP

Leaders of the Ghadar uprising in 1915. Forty-six Ghadarites were hanged to death and 64 sentenced to life transportation. Lenin’s and socialist Russia’s wholehearted support to independence for colonial countries attracted the Ghadar heroes and two of them, Bhai Santokh Singh and Ratan Singh, went as delegates and observers to attend the Fourth Congress of the Communist International.

Twenty-five of the prisoners in the Meerut conspiracy case. So profound was the impact of the formation of the Communist Party under the direct inspiration of the October Revolution that the British Crown panicked at the possibility of a Bolshevik revolt in India. British colonialism sought to nip in the bud the infant Communist movement by launching a series of conspiracy cases—the Peshawar conspiracy case (1922-23), the Kanpur conspiracy case (1924), the famous Meerut conspiracy case later and a host of other such cases to persecute the Communists. Photo: The Hindu Archives

The October Revolution must be seen as an event that profoundly changed the character of the Indian people’s struggle for freedom and for carrying forward the struggle of transforming the political independence of the country towards the economic independence of its people.

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