Bhutan

Green country

Print edition : July 10, 2015

Kuenselphodrang National Park. It was established in July 2006 to protect the forest around the 169-foot Buddha Dordenma statue, one of the tallest Buddha statues in the world. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

Bhutanese children in Gasa, where the headquarters of Jigme Dorji National Park is located. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

On the journey to Haa from Thimphu, a scenic view of the ripening wheat fields. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

Rosa macrophylla, a common flower in Bhutan’s moist valleys. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

In June, the peak flowering of rhododendrons had come to an end, and yet late flowering species such as Rhododendron setosum adorned the trail. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

In June, the peak flowering of rhododendrons had come to an end, and yet late flowering species such as Rhododendron lepidotum adorned the trail. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

A Rosa sericea plant, whose fruits are possibly eaten by pheasants and barking deer. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

Euphorbia griffithii, one of Bhutan’s many colourful flower species. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

The flowers of cutleaf buttercup (Ranunculus brotherusii) looked like specks of molten gold on the forest floor. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

The Mo chu (mother river) gushing out of Jigme Dorji National Park. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

Gasa Dzong in Jigme Dorji National Park. It was built in the 17th century. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

The fertile Paro valley. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

A painting on a wall in a resort in Haa. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

The densely forested mountains of Jigme Dorji National Park. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh

The international conservation community should admire the efforts Bhutan is making to preserve its environment and give it the maximum support possible so that the country can continue to be the biodiversity-rich oxygen tank of the world.
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