Print edition : July 20, 2018

Pendrum Asubai, seen here along with other women of Mysampet. She has been hearing about relocation from 2012, when she moved here.

One of several unfinished houses in the village.

Mysampet, a village of about 80 families living deep within the tiger reserve's core area. There is a proposal to move this village of Raj Gond and Nayakapod tribes to create larger inviolate spaces for tigers and their prey base.

Lakshman, a beat officer of Rampur range, shows a salt slab fixed by the Forest Department for animals, which lick the slab and drink water from the watering hole created for them with solar-powered groundwater pumps.

Animals lick the slab and drink water from the watering hole created for them with solar-powered groundwater pumps.

Prabhakar, a beat officer of Kaddem range, stands at the site where villagers from Mysampet and Rampur will be relocated. He says it has not been easy to keep the land clear of encroachments from the neighbouring villages.

Strike force officials Jalapathi, Maru, Guglabad Anil and Venkatesh. They patrol the jungles in their forest ranges to track illegal activities and are paid Rs.6,500 each a month. Photo: SDS ADSAD

In a rare situation, bureaucratic delays are hampering the relocation of willing communities from five tribal villages in the Kawal Tiger Reserve in northern Telangana.
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