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Lions of Gir

While the continued growth of the lion population in the Gir Protected Area and the dispersal of lions bring cheer, issues relating to human-carnivore conflict create anxiety for the future.
Adult lion.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Lioness with cubs.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Cubs.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Cubs at play with mother.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Lioness with cub.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Adult lion.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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The beautiful Indian Pitta, whose arrival in Gir signals the onset of the monsoon.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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A farmer and his family on their farm.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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Bjra crop cultivated on farms around the Gir PA.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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Chital deer, important prey for lions and leopards.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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A veiw of the dry deciduous Gir forest.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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Onion crop cultivated in farms around the Gir PA.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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A typical woman of the Ahir community, which resides near the Gir forest.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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Besides lions, the Gir forest has a high density of leopards.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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An example of the rich bird life of the Gir forest.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Sambar deer, important prey for lions and leopards.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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The proud Indian peafowl.Photo: Meena Venkataraman.
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A typical Maldhari of the Gir forest.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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A typical Maldhari of the Gir forest.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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A typical person from the Siddhi community living in the Gir forest.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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Children of the Siddhi community.Photo: Meena Venkataraman
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A typical Maldhari of the Gir forest.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Vulture.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Adult lion claw-marking a tree.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Women of the Siddi community with a basket of jamuns.Photo: Bushan Pandya
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Living on the edge

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