Conservation

Wood ducks once again flourish in the U.S.

G. Shaheed Photographs by Vineeth Radhakrishnan

 

Wood ducks are widely distributed in the U.S. The ones featured here were photographed in four locations in Texas, U.S. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A Female WOOD DUCK with ducklings. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
These birds look like they are whispering to each other. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A male wood duck, easily recognisable by the iridescent green feathers of its head and brightly patterned body. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A female wood duck; the females are not as brightly coloured as the males. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A juvenile wood duck. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A family outing. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
These birds were once killed for their meat and feathers. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
After a swim, this male is looking to take off. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
The enactment of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in the U.S. in 1918 paved the way for the way for the protection of these and other birds in the country. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A wood duck pair. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A male putting on a display of its colourful feathers. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A male stretching. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A male vocalising. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
A male preening. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
In 1934, the Migratory Birds Hunting Stamp Act came into force in the U.S.; it enables the government to raise funds for environmental protection by selling stamps. The sale of duck stamps has raised a lot of money for conservation over the years. Photo: Vineeth Radhakrishnan
Vineeth Radhakrishnan. Photo: By Special Arrangement
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor