The world of beetles

The giraffe weevil (Cycnotrachelus flavotuberosus). Weevils are a type of beetle and they are a menace to crops. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Water beetle. The Cherokees believed that this beetle created the earth. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Mehearchus dispar of the family Tenebrionidae. The Eleodes beetle of Mexico belongs to this family. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Net-winged beetle. Forty per cent of all animal life on the earth is beetles and weevils. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Tiger beetle, Cicindela catena. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Tiger beetle, Cicindela (Cosmodela) cf. aurulenta. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Stag beetle, family Lucanidae. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Stag beetle, Odontolabis sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Chafer, Dicronocephalus wallichii. Photo: Geetha Iyer
A male rhinocerous beetle, Xylotrupes gideon. It hisses when disturbed but is harmless. Photo: Geetha Iyer
A beetle with its elytra, or forewings, open, exposing its inner membranous wings that are used for flying. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarabs were revered by various cultures, especially the ancient Egyptians. An Indian scarab, Mimela sp.
Scarabs were revered by various cultures, especially the ancient Egyptians. An Indian scarab, castor seed beetle (Anatona cf. stillata). Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarabs were revered by various cultures, especially the ancient Egyptians. An Indian scarab, Melolontha sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Click beetles are generally nocturnal and are plant feeders. Here, a click beetle of the Cryptalaus species. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Click beetles are generally nocturnal and are plant feeders. Here, a click beetle of the Cryptalaus species. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The colours of jewel beetles (here, Chrysochroa sp.) are produced because of the phenomenon of interference of light when it falls on their elytra. Photo: Yeshwanth H.M.
The colours of jewel beetles (here, Chrysochroa sp.) are produced because of the phenomenon of interference of light when it falls on their elytra. Photo: Yeshwanth H.M.
Jewel, or metallic wood-boring, beetle (Catoxantha opulenta). Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarab, Popillia cupricollis. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarab, Mimela sp.
Scarab, Anomala sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarab, Anomala sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarab, Anomala sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Scarab, Popilllia cyanea. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Light falling on the chitinous layers of a beetle's elytra produces shining colours, which are called structural colours, and they do not fade. This is a concept carmakers are studying for use in car paint. Here, Popillia sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Light falling on the chitinous layers of a beetle's elytra produces shining colours, which are called structural colours, and they do not fade. This is a concept carmakers are studying for use in car paint. Here, Trigonophorus sp.
Light falling on the chitinous layers of a beetle's elytra produces shining colours, which are called structural colours, and they do not fade. This is a concept carmakers are studying for use in car paint. Here, a leaf chafer (Rutelinae family). Photo: Geetha Iyer
Australian jewel beetle (Julodimorpha bakewelli) trying to copulate with a beer bottle. Researchers found that beetle numbers were declining because the male beetles were dying while trying to mate with the bottles, which they mistook for the female of the species. Australian beer companies solved the problem by changing the design and colour of the bottles. Photo: Courtesy: Darryl Gwynne
Stag beetle, Prosopocoilus cf. occipitalis. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Stag beetle, Hexarthrius sp. Photo: Geetha Iyer
A beetle (family Meloidae) showing reflex bleeding from a joint, that is, it produces the poisonous substance cantharidin. This is a a defence mechanism in many beetles. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Pollinator beetles in an arum plant. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Leaf-chewing beetle. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Defoliator beetle, Calopepla leayana. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The beetles of the family Chrysomeloidae (leaf beetles) also have iridescent elytra. Here, a leaf beetle of the Merista species. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The beetles of the family Chrysomeloidae (leaf beetles) also have iridescent elytra. Here, a leaf beetle of the Merista species. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Insects are capable of adapting to changing habitats as their survival for millions of years has shown. Here, a leaf beetle. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Insects are capable of adapting to changing habitats as their survival for millions of years has shown. Here, a leaf beetle. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Studies indicate that the diversity of dung beetles is on the decline in India and in Europe. Dung beetle, Paragymnopleurus sp.
Studies indicate that the diversity of dung beetles is on the decline in India and in Europe. Dung beetle, Copris magicus. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Studies indicate that the diversity of dung beetles is on the decline in India and in Europe. The elephant dung beetle, Heliocopris dominus. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Dead prawns cleaned up in 30 minutes by scavenging scarab beetles in a forest in Arunachal Pradesh. The site at 7:30 p.m. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Dead prawns cleaned up in 30 minutes by scavenging scarab beetles in a forest in Arunachal Pradesh. The site at 9 p.m. Photo: Geetha Iyer
White beetle. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. Photo: Geetha Iyer
A weevil pest on an okra (ladies' finger) plant. Photo: Geetha Iyer
Leaf-rolling weevil, family Attelabidae. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The elytra of weevils are so finely designed that any sculptor who sees them would likely break into a dervish whirl. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The elytra of weevils are so finely designed that any sculptor who sees them would likely break into a dervish whirl. Photo: Geetha Iyer
The elytra of weevils are so finely designed that any sculptor who sees them would likely break into a dervish whirl. Photo: Geetha Iyer
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