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Kanha Tiger Reserve

An inspiring project

The grass-eating hard ground barasingha gives conservationists a lot to cheer about following a slow but sure increase in its almost extinct population at the Kanha Tiger Reserve.
A barasingha female and a fawn at the Kanha Tiger Reserve. The fawn has spots at birth and is often confused with a chital.
A barasingha female and a fawn at the Kanha Tiger Reserve. The fawn has spots at birth and is often confused with a chital.Photo: Sanjay K. Shukla
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The Barasingha population of three subspecies—the hard ground barasingha endemic to Kanha, the northern subspecies and the north-eastern subspecies—is faced with many challenges, resulting in a low growth rate.
The Barasingha population of three subspecies—the hard ground barasingha endemic to Kanha, the northern subspecies and the north-eastern subspecies—is faced with many challenges, resulting in a low growth rate.Photo: Sanjay K. Shukla
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A full-grown stag with the characteristic 12-point antler configuration.
A full-grown stag with the characteristic 12-point antler configuration.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
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Grassland and a waterbody, an ideal habitat for the graminivore, at Kanha.
Grassland and a waterbody, an ideal habitat for the graminivore, at Kanha.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
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In the past, populations of this deer occurred across undivided Madhya Pradesh and in Maharashtra, Bihar, Odisha and Andhra Pradesh.
In the past, populations of this deer occurred across undivided Madhya Pradesh and in Maharashtra, Bihar, Odisha and Andhra Pradesh.Photo: Anant Zanjale
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The northern subspecies in a swamp, its natural habitat, at the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve in Uttar Pradesh. Each subspecies differs slightly from the other morphologically.
The northern subspecies in a swamp, its natural habitat, at the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve in Uttar Pradesh. Each subspecies differs slightly from the other morphologically.Photo: Dudhwa Tiger Reserve
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A barasingha herd at the Kanha Tiger Reserve, which supports typical central Indian sal forests and grassy plains.
A barasingha herd at the Kanha Tiger Reserve, which supports typical central Indian sal forests and grassy plains.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
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A tigress watching a herd of barasingha in the distance.
A tigress watching a herd of barasingha in the distance.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
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Jackals go for selective predation of newborns, upsetting the recruitment of the barasingha.
Jackals go for selective predation of newborns, upsetting the recruitment of the barasingha.Photo: Anant Zanjale
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An alert herd, though its anti-predator reflexes are relatively slow.
An alert herd, though its anti-predator reflexes are relatively slow.Photo: Suresh Deshmukh
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Pythons can sometimes upset the number of fawns in protected areas.
Pythons can sometimes upset the number of fawns in protected areas.Photo: Anant Zanjale
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The north-eastern barasingha in the Kaziranga National Park in Assam.
The north-eastern barasingha in the Kaziranga National Park in Assam.Photo: Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
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Kanha is a combination of beauty and biodiversity.
Kanha is a combination of beauty and biodiversity.Photo: Abhishek Singh
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