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On the verge of extinction

The orange-finned mahseer is on the verge of extinction in its original habitat, the Cauvery river, following unregulated fishing and the introduction of the blue-finned mahseer. There is an urgent need to restore its status.
A blue-finned mahseer weighing 40 pounds (18.14 kilograms) caught in the Cauvery by Owen-Bosen on January 5, 2010.Photo: Sandeep Chakravarti
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An orange-finned mahseer weighing 90 pounds (43 kg) caught in the Cauvery by Alberto Parish on January 13, 2008.Photo: John Bailey
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An orange-finned-mahseer, which was caught and released during a survey conducted by WASI, with permission from the Tamil Nadu Forest Department, in the Moyar on March 13.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The blue tail of a blue-finned mahseer.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The Bhavani river and the Pillur dam may still support a population of the orange-finned mahseer.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The Moyar has a population of the orange-finned mahseer. The blue-finned mahseer has not been introduced in this river.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The Cauvery during the monsoon months. The orange-finned mahseer here can weigh up to 68 kg.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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Hogenakkal falls. It forms the eastern end of the orange-finned mahseer’s habitat in the lower Cauvery.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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Shivasamudram falls. It marks the beginning of the orange-finned mahseer’s habitat in the lower Cauvery.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The Nandhour valley in Uttarakhand. It is home to the golden mahseer, the goral, the serow, the sambar, the elephant and the tiger.Photo: AJT Johnsingh
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The golden mahseer, caught and released in the Ramganga river in Uttarakhand.Photo: Misty Dillon
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