Conservation

Poaching in the Mishmi Hills

A bull takin with a female and a kid. Photo: Tiger Sangay
The misty, snow-bound takin habitat in the Mishmi Hills. Photo: A.J.T. JOHNSINGH
A female cow with her calf on the banks of the Siang river. Photo: RITU RAJ KONWAR
A mother with her young. The golden coloured calf looks like that of a gaur (Indian bison). Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
The Lohit river in Mishmi Land. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Erianthus logisetosus. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Rupus calycinus in the open patches in the forest. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Thurbergia coccinea, an ornamental species, seen in the Lohit landscape. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Luculia gratissima in bloom. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Polygonum sphaerocephalum with black seeds. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Hydrangia heteromalla, commonly found on the way to the Mayodia pass. Photo: A.J.T. JOHNSINGH
Terminalia myriocarpa with its attractive pinkish-red flowers. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Polygonum capitum, another captivating species growing in open areas. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Oxyspora paniculata with its deeply veined leaves. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
A takin trying to protect its kid from a dhole. Photo: DHRITIMAN MUKHERJEE
A Bhutan takin family. In the higher altitudes, the takin is an important prey of the tiger. Photo: Nature Conservation Division, Thimphu
A mithun bull in the Mishmi Hills. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
The serow is another species that is heavily hunted in Mishmi Hills. Photo: Dhritiman Mukherjee
Ornage orchards are promoted to wean people away from shifting cultivation. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
In a fish market at Roing. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
A Mishmi girl selling oranges in Roing. Photo: A.J.T. Johnsingh
Mishmi dancers. Dibang Valley district is home to the Mishmis. Photo: THE HINDU ARCHIVES
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