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Conservation

The Kanha model

The Kanha Tiger Reserve’s goal-oriented strategies and systematic conservation practices have over the years made it an embodiment of the concept of biodiversity conservation in the country, one that others can emulate.
The black-naped monarch.
The black-naped monarch.Photo: Anant Zanjale
1/18
The grey wagtail.
The grey wagtail.Photo: Anant Zanjale
2/18
The ruddy sheldrake.
The ruddy sheldrake.Photo: Anant Zanjale
3/18
The crested hawk-eagle. Raptors are an important health indicator of a wildlife ecosystem.
The crested hawk-eagle. Raptors are an important health indicator of a wildlife ecosystem.Photo: Anant Zanjale
4/18
Despite the effort put into the conservation of the tiger, it remains a highly endangered species and needs stringent protection and a good prey base for survival.
Despite the effort put into the conservation of the tiger, it remains a highly endangered species and needs stringent protection and a good prey base for survival.Photo: Rachit Singh
5/18
Despite the effort put into the conservation of the tiger, it remains a highly endangered species and needs stringent protection and a good prey base for survival.
Despite the effort put into the conservation of the tiger, it remains a highly endangered species and needs stringent protection and a good prey base for survival.Photo: Anant Zanjale
6/18
The amazing flying squirrel is a master glider-mammal, which relies on a wing-like structure of its extended skin.
The amazing flying squirrel is a master glider-mammal, which relies on a wing-like structure of its extended skin.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
7/18
The elusive mouse deer. Its presence is indicative of the health of an ecosystem. It is a unique, shy and well-camouflaged small deer, which has a three-chambered stomach instead of the four-chambered one seen in other ruminants.
The elusive mouse deer. Its presence is indicative of the health of an ecosystem. It is a unique, shy and well-camouflaged small deer, which has a three-chambered stomach instead of the four-chambered one seen in other ruminants.Photo: Anant Zanjale
8/18
A mixed herd of sambar deer in summer.
A mixed herd of sambar deer in summer.Photo: Anant Zanjale
9/18
The hard ground barasingha, endemic to Kanha, is threatened by many factors.
The hard ground barasingha, endemic to Kanha, is threatened by many factors.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
10/18
A barking deer in typical sal patch.
A barking deer in typical sal patch.Photo: Suresh Deshmukh
11/18
Although overshadowed by the tiger, the leopard is an amazing animal that is equally endangered.
Although overshadowed by the tiger, the leopard is an amazing animal that is equally endangered.Photo: Anant Zanjale
12/18
The sloth bear. It is a Schedule I animal that is poached mainly for its gall bladder. The bile supposedly has medicinal value.
The sloth bear. It is a Schedule I animal that is poached mainly for its gall bladder. The bile supposedly has medicinal value.Photo: Anant Zanjale
13/18
An annual rejuvenation camp for  elephants owned by the Forest Department. These well-trained pachyderms play a great role in the protection of remote areas of Kanha.
An annual rejuvenation camp for elephants owned by the Forest Department. These well-trained pachyderms play a great role in the protection of remote areas of Kanha.Photo: Suresh Deshmukh
14/18
The king vulture. Its steady decline has been a matter of concern. Kanha still supports a small population of this species.
The king vulture. Its steady decline has been a matter of concern. Kanha still supports a small population of this species.Photo: Suresh Deshmukh
15/18
Collared scops owls.
Collared scops owls.Photo: Anant Zanjale
16/18
Conservation efforts have restored Kanha's healthy and structurally complex forests of sal and mixed vegetation and its excellent grasslands.
Conservation efforts have restored Kanha's healthy and structurally complex forests of sal and mixed vegetation and its excellent grasslands.Photo: Sudhir Mishra
17/18
Wild dogs, known as the “whistling hunters”. They are Schedule I animals under the Wildlife Act and their distribution outside protected areas is seriously threatened.
Wild dogs, known as the “whistling hunters”. They are Schedule I animals under the Wildlife Act and their distribution outside protected areas is seriously threatened.Photo: Anant Zanjale
18/18