Phillippines: Ferdinand Marcos' son announces Presidential bid

Published : October 05, 2021 17:52 IST

Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., the son and namesake of the late dictator of the Philippines, announced his bid for the Presidency. Photo: AP

The son of the late Filipino dictator Ferdinand Marcos has announced his bid for the presidency in 2022. He joins a field of contenders seeking to replace the outgoing Rodrigo Duterte.

The son of the former dictator of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., 64, announced his bid, on October 5, for the country's highest office in next year's election.

Popularly known as "Bongbong," the son who bears the same name as his father, said in a speech streamed on Facebook Live that he is throwing his hat in the ring to replace President Rodrigo Duterte, who is stepping downdue to term limits, in the 2022 elections.

"Join me in this noblest process and we will succeed," Marcos Jr. said. Marcos Jr. has defended Duterte's drug wars and urged the death penalty for drug traffickers. Meanwhile, Duterte controversially gave the late Marcos a hero's burial.

Who is the Marcos family?

The announcement comes as the Marcos family has long sought to revive its political fortunes. Marcos Jr. has been involved in politics since he returned from exile in the United States in 1991.

He has previously served as a provincial governor, congressman and senator and his ill-fated bid for the vice-presidency in 2016 ended in defeat, which he tried to reverse using the courts. His sister Imee is currently a sitting senator.

Marcos Jr. is the fourth candidate to announce a bid for the presidency in 2022. The mayor of Manila, Francisco Domagoso, registered his candidacy Monday and boxing legend Manny Pacquaio has also announced. A former police chief, Senator Panfilo Lacson, has also said he is running.

The elder Marcos was overthrown in 1986 after more than two decades in power. His regime was characterized by brutality and kleptocracy. His wife, Immelda, was notorious worldwide for her extensive shoe collection, when she was first lady over 21 years. She previously served as a congresswoman.

ar/wmr (AFP, Reuters)

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