Cinema

In the south: Local flavour, global reach

Print edition : September 01, 2017

A still from Baahubali 2: The Conclusion. It is the most recent testament to the strength and potential of "regional", "vernacular" cinema to create state-of-the-art spectacle that can take on both Bollywood and Hollywood on their own terms.

The 1970s and 1980s saw a generation of angry young men who were disillusioned, lonely and frustrated with the system. Kamal Hassan, Rajinikanth, Vishnuvardhan and Ambarish gave body and voice to the angst and anger of these decades.

The 1970s and 1980s saw a generation of angry young men who were disillusioned, lonely and frustrated with the system. Mammootty, Mohanlal, Chiranjeevi and Nagarjuna gave body and voice to the angst and anger of these decades.

(Clockwise from top left) Bapu, Puttanna Kanagal, Jandhyala, B.R. Panthulu.

(Clockwise from top left) Balu Mahendra, K. Balachander, Aravindan, K. Viswanath.

(Clockwise from top left) Bharathirajaa, Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Maniratnam, Girish Kasaravalli.

There has been a radical change in all areas of film-making in the new millennium. But the crisis of the local and regional in globalised times is that its own audience is hooked on the global. If any kind of alternative cinema is to survive, film-makers of the local need to create new narratives of space and time, by bringing everything back to human scale, natural pace and historical moment.
    This article is closed for comments.
    Please Email the Editor
    ×