Heritage

Bijapur's grandeur

VIKHAR AHMED SAYEED

 

The Ibrahim Rauza contains the tomb of Ibrahim Adil Shah II (r. 1580-1627). The tomb and the mosque in the complex were built by Malik Sandal, the celebrated Abyssinian architect in the Adil Shahi Sultanate of Bijapur. Photo: By Special Arrangement
The perforated script carved on basaltic stone on one of the entrances to the tomb of Ibrahim Adil Shah II. Photo: By special arrangement
The Gagan Mahal (Heavenly Palace) was built by Ali Adil I (r. 1558-1579) after the Battle of Talikota in 1565. Photo: By special arrangement
The Malik-e-Maidan (Lord of the Field), whose muzzle displays a lion holding small elephants in its teeth. Photo: By Special arrangement
The Haidar burj (bastion), known popularly as the Upli burj, was built in 1583, probably to accommodate a long iron cannon. Photo: By special arrangement
The Gol Gumbaz, the tomb of Mohammed Adil Shah (r. 1627-1656). Its hemispherical dome is one of the largest free-standing domes in the world. Photo: By special arrangement
Abdul Gani Imaratwale, historian and author of “Studies in Bijapur Sultanate”.
“Studies in Bijapur Sultanate” edited by Abdul Gani Imaratwale and Maqsood Afzal Jagirdar (Afzal Khan Memorial Trust) Photo: By special arrangement
The Jami Masjid that was begun by Ali Adil Shah I after the Deccan Sultanates’ victory over Vijayanagara at the Battle of Talikota in 1565. Photo: By Special Arrangement
The Taj baoli (a public tank or stepwell) was constructed around 1620 by Malik Sandal and named after Taj Sultan, the favourite queen of Ibrahim Adil Shah II. Photo: By special arrangement
The large and ornate “mihrab”(prayer niche in the direction of which the congregation prays) of the Jami Masjid of Bijapur added by Mohammed Adil Shah (r. 1627-1656) in 1636. Photo: By special arrangement
The mosque of Afzal Khan (d. 1569), a powerful generalissimo of the Adil Shahi Sultanate, located in Afzalpur. Photo: By special arrangement
A bathing tower in Kumatagi, around 25 kilometres from Bijapur. Resorts such as Kumatagi provided a space for relaxation for the Adil Shahi Sultans. Photo: By special arrangement
The tomb of Ain-ul-mulk, a noble at the court of Ibrahim Adil Shah I, in Ainapur on the outskirts of Bijapur. Photo: By special arrangement
Asar Mahal, originally intended as a hall of public audience but later converted into a building housing a holy relic of Prophet Mohammed. Photo: By special arrangement
The cenotaph of Afzal Khan. Photo: By special arrangement
The Chand baoli. Baolis were the main source of water for the fortified cities of the Deccan. Photo: By special arrangement
The unfinished tomb of Ali Adil Shah II (r. 1656-1672) commonly known as Barakaman (twelve arches) in Bijapur. If this structure had been completed, it would have been bigger than Gol Gumbaz. Photo: By Special Arrangement
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