Heritage

Lalbagh in all its glory

Vikhar Ahmed Sayeed Photographs by K. Murali Kumar

 

The bandstand at Lalbagh, built around 150 years ago, was the early location of the flower shows. Behind the bandstand is a towering Christmas tree (Araucaria columnaris) that can be seen from any part of the garden. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The Glass House is the venue of the annual flower show. It was completed in 1889 and was meant to be a miniature version of the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
During the Republic Day Lalbagh Flower Show 2020, in the Glass House of Lalbagh on January 17, 2020. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The Mysore trumpetvine (Thungbergia mysorensis) is a profusely flowering creeper. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
A flower belonging to the Alpinia genus of plants, with its glass-like, translucent petals. This flowering plant is native to the Philippines and Taiwan. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
A flower belonging to the Alpinia genus of plants, with its glass-like, translucent petals. This flowering plant is native to the Philippines and Taiwan. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The yellow trumpetbush (Tecoma stans) is a flowering shrub native to South America. Its bright yellow flowers are full of nectar and attract bees. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The spectacular flowers of the pink poui (Tabebuia rosea) tree, which was originally native to South America. This tree sheds all its leaves in spring, and for around 10 days, its flowers blossom in a glorious outburst. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The flower of the golden chalice vine (Solandra maxima) plant, which is endemic to Brazil. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The spiky flower of the crimson bottlebrush (Callistemon citrinus) shrub, which is native to Australia. The stamens, when packed together, resemble a bottlebrush. Bees can be found hovering around its flowers, which are full of nectar. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The last remaining mango tree dating back to Tipu Sultan’s era. This tree is the pride of Lalbagh and still produces up to a tonne of mangoes every two years. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The banyan strangler fig of the Ficus genus, which sprouts from a seed the size of a pinhead most probably dropped by a passing bird. The strangler draws nourishment from its host, in this case a palm tree, throttling it in the process. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
A clump of African juniper trees (Juniperus procera) planted during Gustav Hermann Krumbiegel’s tenure as Superintendent of Lalbagh. The African juniper is the only one of the 45 juniper species to be found in the southern hemisphere. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
Vijay R. Thiruvady, the author of “Lalbagh: Sultans’ Gardens to Public Park”. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The book (Bangalore Environment Trust, Bengaluru, 2020, Rs.750) contains rare botanical illustrations from the mid 19th century.
A Buddha statue carved out of a fallen eucalyptus tree trunk and appropriately placed under a massive peepal, or bodhi, tree (Ficus religiosa). The Buddha attained enlightenment under a peepal tree. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
One of the many centuries-old Nandi statues found in Lalbagh. This statue is located at the base of a rain tree (Samanea saman) near the Lalbagh rock. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The goni mara (Ficus mysorensis). This particular specimen of the tree in Lalbagh has a spread of over 160 feet and has just shed its leaves. The tree was named by Benjamin Heyne, an early administrator of the garden. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The traveller’s palm (Ravenala madagascariensis) is a flowering tree originally from Madagascar where it is pollinated by lemurs. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The fruit of the elephant apple (Dillenia indica) tree, which is native to India. This tree flourishes along waterbodies and is a favourite of elephants. Dillenia indica has the honour of being named by Carl Linnaeus, the father of taxonomy. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The talipot palm (Corypha umbraculifera) is found in the evergreen forests of Karnataka. Throughout Indian history, the dried fronds of this tree were used for writing on. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
The 3.5-billion-year-old Lalbagh rock crowned by Kempegowda’s tower, erected in 1537. This granite hill was declared a National Geological Monument in 1975. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
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