In the land of lemurs

Sudha Mahalingam Photographs by Sudha Mahalingam

 

A tiny bamboo lemur at the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in eastern Madagascar. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A brown lemur mother and baby. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A brown lemur mother and baby. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
The indri, which local people call babakoto. It is the largest lemur species on the island and the star attraction of the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
The indri, which local people call babakoto. It is the largest lemur species on the island and the star attraction of the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
The indri, which local people call babakoto. It is the largest lemur species on the island and the star attraction of the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A sifaka. Sifakas can be distinguished from indris by their long tails. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A collared sifaka. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A red-ruffed lemur in the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A mouse lemur at the Kirindy reserve, a privately managed forest close to the city of Morondava on the west coast. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
The fossa is the only predator on the island. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A fork-marked lemur at Kirindy. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A Parson’s chameleon, part of the collection of exotic chameleons at the Peyrieras Reptile Reserve, which is west of Andasibe. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A panther chameleon, part of the collection of exotic chameleons at the Peyrieras Reptile Reserve, which is west of Andasibe. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A leaf-tailed gecko, indistinguishable from the tree trunk to which it seems stuck. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A colourful chameleon resident of the Peyrieras Reptile Reserve. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A panther chameleon. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A panther chameleon. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
Another chameleon resident of Peyrieras. Madagascar has more than 150 species of chameleons, not to mention geckos, newts, garden lizards and related species. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
Another chameleon resident of Peyrieras. Madagascar has more than 150 species of chameleons, not to mention geckos, newts, garden lizards and related species. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
A tomato frog, also at the Peyrieras Reptile Reserve. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
Madagascar leaf snake. The island has no venomous snakes. Photo: Sudha Mahalingam
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