Letters to the Editor

Print edition : October 28, 2016

Cauvery dispute

River water sharing has been a bone of contention between States, and the Cauvery dispute is no exception (Cover story, October 14). The problem becomes more pronounced when there is a poor monsoon, leading to lower storage in the reservoirs, especially in the Krishnarajasagar dam near Mysuru. There is no consensus between Karnataka and Tamil Nadu on the quantum of release when there is deficient rainfall. Politics takes centre stage when passions run high on both sides, with lumpen elements taking to the streets and damaging public and private property. Bandhs and protests are the order of the day in a highly charged atmosphere. Any concession or compromise on a State’s rigid stand is a “loss of face” and politically disastrous for the party in power. That is why political parties are wary of any concession lest they be branded as traitors to the cause of the State. We need the States to rise above politics and try to find a compromise. For this to happen, teams from both the States consisting of experts and farmers should be formed. Conservation of water and periodical desilting of reservoirs should be undertaken on a regular basis.

D.B.N. Murthy, Bengaluru

It is a sensitive issue for both Karnataka and Tamil Nadu farmers. If there is less rain owing to the vagaries of the monsoon, the problem gets aggravated and emotions take the upper hand. The century-old dispute should be tackled by expert engineers and not by politicians with parochial mindsets. The need of the hour is formation of a Cauvery management board whose verdict should be final. Let us hope that an amicable solution will soon emerge.

N.C. Sreedharan, Kannur, Kerala



RSS & Gandhi

I FEEL a deep sense of gratitude towards A.G. Noorani for the courage and candour that he has shown all along (“RSS & Gandhi’s murder”, October 14). His clinching evidence in “nailing the RSS’ lie” requires reiteration. (I have added to my own humble arsenal his apt definition of the RSS as “this disreputable & utterly despicable body”.) He has promised, as a true devotee of truth, that he will keep writing on the “nexus between Savarkar and Godse and also Godse’s membership and loyalty to the RSS” as long as he is alive. M.K. Gandhi would have felt proud that one of his sacred doctrines (truth) has a staunch votary in Noorani. Providing ample space for such quality journalism is what makes Frontline unique.

H. Pattabhirama Somayaji, Mangaluru, Karnataka

I STRONGLY believed that though Nathuram Godse was a member of the Hindu Mahasabha, he was not associated with the RSS at the time of Gandhi’s assassination. But after reading Noorani’s article, even a member of the RSS would wonder why the RSS, if it was really innocent, did not follow the Hindu Mahasabha’s example and condemn “unequivocally… this foul act”. Why did it distribute sweets after the assassination? The court may have said that Godse was not a member of the RSS, but as Godse’s brother Gopal Godse has affirmed, he was very much a member of the RSS at the time of the assassination.

Bidyut Kumar Chatterjee, Faridabad, Haryana



Divided parivar

It is clear that the gulf between Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav and his uncle Shivpal Yadav has only increased (“Divided family”, October 14). Samajwadi Party chief Mulyam Singh Yadav might have restored peace temporarily and ensured that the parivar and the party did not split, but how long things will remain calm is the million dollar question. It has become a true battle of egos, which will only hurt the Yadav family and the party in the long term. The appointment of Amar Singh as party general secretary shows who is calling the shots in the party. And in the process, it is the stature of the Chief Minister that has been reduced.

Bal Govind, Noida, Uttar Pradesh



Ramkumar’s death

Ramkumar’s death has raised many questions, which need answers from the police and the Puzhal prison authorities (“Suspicious end”, October 14). The police’s narrative of how Ramkumar slit his throat while being arrested in his native place does not ring true. It was inhumane that after his arrest he was shifted constantly from one place to another in Chennai and an extrajudicial confession was extracted from him. An accused person is innocent until he/she is proven guilty and is protected by the law even when he/she is in judicial custody. The state should punish the police and prison authorities under whose watch he died. The government must set its criminal justice system in order and ensure the basic rights of the accused.

B. Rajasekaran, Bengaluru



U.S. election

The presidential election in the United States has reached a crucial stage (“In a hall of mirrors”, October 14). It is a no-holds-barred battle. The campaign was ugly. The first debate, watched by millions all over the world, was heated and both the participants did not get their facts right. The media also seem biased in favour of one candidate: digging all the information it can on Trump but not the other candidate. It is sad that U.S. voters do not have much of a choice and have to select one of them.

Deendayal M. Lulla, Mumbai

A letter from the Editor


Dear reader,

The COVID-19-induced lockdown and the absolute necessity for human beings to maintain a physical distance from one another in order to contain the pandemic has changed our lives in unimaginable ways. The print medium all over the world is no exception.

As the distribution of printed copies is unlikely to resume any time soon, Frontline will come to you only through the digital platform until the return of normality. The resources needed to keep up the good work that Frontline has been doing for the past 35 years and more are immense. It is a long journey indeed. Readers who have been part of this journey are our source of strength.

Subscribing to the online edition, I am confident, will make it mutually beneficial.

Sincerely,

R. Vijaya Sankar

Editor, Frontline

Support Quality Journalism
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor
×