Law, arts and music

Print edition : August 26, 2011

Students at the Government Fine Arts College, Egmore. - V. GANESAN

AFTER engineering and medical colleges, private initiative in Tamil Nadu has turned its attention towards law courses. SASTRA University, Thanjavur, has started two new law courses BCom LLB and BBA LLB in its Law School this academic year. It started BA LLB course in 2008. Vels University, Chennai, plans to start two courses next year.

S. Vaidhyasubramaniam, Dean, Planning and Development, SASTRA University, said the aim was to build a top-class law school. The faculty headed by Dr Ravisekhar Raju, a veteran in legal education, will provide expertise in corporate affairs, taxation, civil law and criminal law.

The university is beginning to work with premier law schools abroad for meaningful internship and study programmes, he said. A library has been set up. The personal law library of late G. Ramaswamy, former Attorney General of India, valued at Rs.3 crore and donated by his brother G. Rajagopalan, Senior Advocate, forms part of this library. Besides, the WiFi facility on the campus provides access to a host of online legal databases.

We will be establishing a law college next academic year. We have got the approval from the Bar Council of India, said K. Ishari Ganesh, founder-Chancellor, Vels University. Two courses will be taught: an integrated five-year course leading to a law degree (BA BL) and a three-year degree in law after graduation. Ganesh, himself a law graduate, said he was motivated to start the law college by the fact that there were not many private law colleges in India. If a course in law is one option for Plus Two students or those with a degree, several options are available for those interested in sculpture, painting, ceramics, folk arts, vocal music, instrumental music, and so on.

Government College of Fine Arts in Chennai is the oldest art school in India. It was established in 1850 as School of Arts and Crafts by Dr Alexander Hunter for training industrial draftsmen, modellers, craftsmen and printers for the government.The Government College of Fine Arts offers a four-year degree programme, Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), in Painting, Sculpture, Visual Communication Design, Industrial Design in Ceramics, Industrial Design in Textiles and Print-making. V. Chandrasekaran, the Principal, said students graduating from the college also joined medical colleges as artists for making 2D and 3D sketches of the anatomy.

According to K. Pugazhenthi, lecturer, the college provides drawing-based education. This is its strength. In the last few years, sculpture has gained more value, he said. Those who want to work in multimedia find the course offered in sculpture useful.

The Government College of Architecture and Sculpture at Mamallapuram, 50 km from Chennai, offers a four-year course in architecture, stucco figurines (sudhai in Tamil), wood, bronze and stone sculptures and painting. Students with a pass in plus two can join these courses. The Tamil Nadu Government Music College does not put a cap on the number of students to be admitted to various courses. Four hundred to 500 students join the courses every year. Any number can join, said a college spokeswoman.

For students who have passed the 10th standard, the college offers three-year diploma courses in vocal music, violin, veena, mridangam, flute, nadaswaram, thavil, ghatam, kanjira, morsing, folk arts and Bharatanatyam (only for women). There is a two-year diploma course for those who want to be trained as music teachers. It also offers two-year certificate courses.

T.S. Subramanian

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