Ranthambore National Park

Tiger with a human face

Print edition : October 12, 2018

The Bengal tiger at a waterhole in the Ranthambore National Park. Photo: Aditya Singh

Noor and her three cubs on a hilly forest path in the national park. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

The watchful ambush in the forest. The cubs are taught how to hide, camouflage themselves amidst rustling dry grass and the forest cover, and stalk prey without being noticed. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

Noor carrying her cub in her powerful jaws. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

Play time, The mother-cubs bonding is something photographers long to capture. Photo: Aditya Singh

Play time. The mother-cubs bonding is something photographers long to capture. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

The Ranthambore fort in the national park. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

In the protective care of the mother. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

Noor’s cub nuzzling at her after a lesson in kill. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

The tigress and her cubs quenching their thirst at a pond in the park. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

A sloth bear (Melursus ursinus) confronts Noor in the dry forests of the park. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

A mating pair on a rocky plateau in the national park. Photo: Aditya Dicky Singh

Aditya Dicky Singh Photo: By special arrangement

If the Ranthambore National Park in Rajasthan is a conservation success story, the tigers of the reserve have remarkable life stories of their own. The biggest draw of the park today is Noor and her three cubs.
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